It's been a long time coming, but I finally put myself first and scheduled a sleep study for sleep apnea.

For years, I was becoming more tired by the day. It didn't matter if I went to bed early or got a full eight hours of sleep, I simply wasn't getting the REM sleep needed to recharge my mind and body.

Each day that passed, my sleep patterns were getting worse. It was to the point where I would stop breathing for several (and I mean several) seconds in mid-sleep before coming to and gasping for air.

The scariest part is that I didn't even realize I was doing this.

Get our free mobile app

After calling my primary doctor to schedule a sleep study, I crossed my fingers that my insurance would approve it. Luckily, I received the green light and set up a date and time to have a sleep study conducted.

The lab in Somerset gave three check-in options: 7, 8 or 9 p.m.. I went with 9 since it's closer to my normal bedtime.

It's important to note that the paperwork took me close to 30 minutes to fill out, so if you're considering a study of your own, plan accordingly and show up at least 20 minutes before your appointment.

This was my room for the next seven hours.

Gazelle/Townsquare Media
Gazelle/Townsquare Media
loading...

After the paperwork, a nurse asked me to change into my comfy pajamas. She then attached numerous diodes and patches to my chest, legs, back and scalp, making it very difficult to maneuver around. Once in bed, I found the only way to get comfortable was to lie straight on my back, facing the ceiling.

The nurse left the room and spoke to me over an intercom, administering commands to ensure that the wires were hooked up correctly. I moved my feet up and down (to detect restless leg syndrome), breathed through my mouth, held my breath for 10 seconds (to detect lung activity) and also ground my teeth.

The next thing I knew, the lights were out and a camera set up in front of me was watching my every movement. There wasn't too much privacy, but again, I was there to better myself.

For years, I was becoming more tired by the day. It didn't matter if I went to bed early or got a full eight hours of sleep, I simply wasn't getting the REM sleep needed to recharge my mind and body.

At 5:30 a.m., the door opened and the lights turned on. My nurse helped remove the wires from my body and gave me one final set of paperwork to fill out before letting me leave.

All in all, it was a little uncomfortable trying to fall asleep covered in wires and sticky patches, but once I did, I was out like a light. I've heard nothing but positive feedback about those CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machines and have never wanted one more in my life.

Even if it does make you look like something out of a sci-fi film.

If it means a healthier new beginning and more energy from getting proper sleep, then who cares what I look like during my slumber? I'm bettering myself and that's the important takeaway from this sleep study.

Now I await the results.

LOOK: 30 fascinating facts about sleep in the animal kingdom