This story hit a little to close to home for me, so the desire to spread the word about the need for a donor is extra important.

Her name is Cheryl Lynn Doucet. She is from Fall River. Cheryl has a rare auto-immune disease known as Good Pastor Disease. She receives dialysis three times a week for four hours each time.

I feel for her. No, not because I have been in her shoes, but because a former co-worker and dear friend of mine has been living this life for over a decade. My friend thought she was in the clear when they found a donor and match with her brother. They went right to work with the transplant. Unfortunately, her body rejected his kidney and back she went to dialysis. Seeing her in the office every day, taking care of those around her and really being my at-work mom, I felt I had to do something.

I took it upon myself to go see if I was a donor. Not a week later they called and said I was a match but needed to take some more tests. I hadn't told her I went, nor that I was a match. I didn't want to jinx it. I guess protocol was to tell the recipient since they would need to come in for further blood work.

Once she found out I went in and was willing to donate, she was so thankful to me, but absolutely refused to let me donate. Well, after further tests (because you know I didn't listen to my at-work mother) I ended up not being the perfect match. However, if I did want to donate still, I could and my friend would have gone to the top of the list for a donation.

I'm pretty sure this is the same situation Cheryl is in. She would absolutely love your help (and kidney), and you can get more information about being a donor here. It's amazing how the national donor network works; they just need more donors.

By the way, my friend/co-worker insisted that I do not donate, as she wouldn't want my kidney to end up somewhere I didn't know. She is still waiting on a donor in Richmond, Virginia.