There has been a lot of controversy about the COVID-19 vaccine and how the rollout of distribution is being handled. But if you can get a vaccine, should you get a vaccine?

I have heard that people bringing older folks to get their vaccines are able to get one themselves while they are there. And I am planning to bring my 70-plus mother to her vaccine appointment next week.

But honestly, I'm only bringing her because she hates shots and can sometimes have a bad reaction to them, not because she is infirm or incapacitated in any way.

So do I deserve to get a COVID vaccine when we go?

I'm thinking no.

I'm am not at all high risk, I basically don't leave my house so I'm not remotely a frontline worker (I'm barely a worker at this point) and I still haven't had any personal contact with anyone who has had COVID.

I am obviously one of the last people who should be getting a vaccine and line jumping just because I drove my mother somewhere seems wrong.

To me, there are still plenty of other people who genuinely need to be vaccinated first that are still waiting. People out in the community every day, putting themselves at higher risk so the rest of us can do and get the things we want and need.

Who am I to get a vaccine before these folks?

Yet nearly half of those receiving vaccines at some locations were well below the age requirements. And some people even resorting to dressing like "grannies" to get their shots.

Does that mean I'm one of the few who is willing to wait my turn? Am I foolish for not getting a vaccine ASAP?

LOOK: Answers to 30 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

While much is still unknown about the coronavirus and the future, what is known is that the currently available vaccines have gone through all three trial phases and are safe and effective. It will be necessary for as many Americans as possible to be vaccinated in order to finally return to some level of pre-pandemic normalcy, and hopefully these 30 answers provided here will help readers get vaccinated as soon they are able.