I'm on the hunt for local horseshoe crabs, because their baby-blue blood is worth big bucks.

Setting the record straight, horseshoe crabs aren't honest-to-goodness crabs. They're more closely related to spiders than they are to other crabs or lobsters. They are “living fossils,” meaning they have existed nearly unchanged for at least 445 million years, well before those pesky Jurassic dinosaurs existed.

Soon, we'll be honoring these creatures on International Horseshoe Crab Day on June 20, recognizing their one-of-a-kind extraordinary value. A horseshoe crab's copper-based blue blood is valued at $15,000 a quart, because it contains a molecule that is crucial to the medical research community – and also is a miracle COVID-vaccine ingredient that's saved millions of lives – called Limulus Amebocyte Lysate, or LAL.

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Horseshoe crabs, by the way, are 100 percent harmless. They don't pinch, bite or sting, and that spiky, scary-looking tail is not a weapon. Despite the ferocious look of it, horseshoe crabs use their tails for righting themselves if they are flipped over by a wave. Never pick one up by its tail because you'll injure it.

It's beyond amazing to think that this has been going on for millions of years. Every year without fail, countless horseshoe crabs clamber onto beaches to lay their eggs. For endangered hungry birds, it’s a cornucopia. For drug companies, it’s a crucial resource for making human medicines safe.

Phil Paleologos/Townsquare Media
Phil Paleologos/Townsquare Media
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We rely on Mother Nature's procreation, so the horseshoe crab continues to do its job, emerging from the sea each spring when the tide is high and the moon is full to begin its march, climbing up onto the beaches to spawn.

Phil Paleologos/Townsquare Media
Phil Paleologos/Townsquare Media
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I've had no luck so far in finding one. I couldn't even find one of their shells from molting season. Be mindful of its value if you happen upon one of these splendid creatures on our local beaches, because for now, they are saving us. Perhaps one day soon, we will repay the favor.

Phil Paleologos/Townsquare Media
Phil Paleologos/Townsquare Media
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Here's a List of All the Snakes Native to Massachusetts (Two Can Kill You)

Did you know that there's a species of rattlesnake found in the Bay State? Or that two of our local venomous serpents can be deadly to humans — but despite what your parents told you, the water moccasin isn't one of them? (They don't even live in Massachusetts.) Love them or hate them, these slithery little suckers are everywhere. Here's what snakes you're most likely to find in your backyard.

Massachusetts Wildlife You Can Legally Take Home as Pets

Massachusetts has such diverse wildlife, but also strict limitations on what you can bring home and cuddle. In fact, there are only certain reptiles and amphibians you can keep as pets (so no raccoons, squirrels, bunnies, etc.) and you are only allowed two of each. The state also says "you cannot sell, barter, or exchange them." Also, keep in mind, these are wildlife, so it's probably best to just leave them be and maybe visit a reptile shop instead to get your next pet.