This may just be the most incredible thing you see all week. A SouthCoast woman was taking a walk through Westport this week when she stumbled across an irreplaceable piece of history.

Maggie Henry said she was walking down the northern part of Drift Road on Wednesday when she came across a postcard. It had an old-style cartoon on the front, scrawled handwriting and a stamp from 1944 on the back, and after some further analysis, she found that it was written by a sailor at the U.S. Naval Training Center in Sampson, New York during World War II.

Photo Courtesy of Maggie Henry
Photo Courtesy of Maggie Henry

Although it's a little hard to read the sailor's name on the card, we believe his first name may be Armand and the '5' next to his name hints that he could have part of a company starting with that number. It's also evident that it was penned to a woman, presumably his wife, named Mrs. F. Alves at 180 Alden St. in Fall River.

Hello Honey. How are you sweets? Got here this morning. We're waiting to get shipped out. Boy am I tired. That train is terrible. Well lovey I guess the Pacific is waiting for us so we're going out there smiling ha ha. Well lovey haven't got much more room so stay strong.

Google Maps

Henry shared pictures of the postcard in hopes of finding its rightful owner.

We tried to do a little digging to find the sailor who wrote the letter on his first day in Sampson and have sent his name, Armand Alves, in to the Sampson Memorial Museum to see if there are any records from his time at the Training Center. The most information we have right now about the sailor who penned the letter to Fall River is that he may have been in Company 564 at the Training Center in Sampson.

Via MilitaryYearbookProject.com

Do you know who the postcard may belong to? Let us know! Send us a message inside our station app or reach out to Maggie Henry on Facebook.

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