City life in New Bedford is as interesting as it gets. This is coming from someone whose neighbors growing up were cows and cornfields.

Now, I'm curious to know if this is normal or not, but my neighbor has somewhat of a problem. It's nothing bad, and as a matter of fact, it works out to my advantage. The question I have for the good people of New Bedford is this: does anyone else's neighbor have a problem with cooking too much food? I know mine does and I'm not mad about it.

You see, my neighbor is a chef and she has trouble with portion control in terms of how much food she cooks at a time. Instead of making a pot pie for two, she only knows how to cook for an army.

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I received a call the other day from my neighbor asking if I had dinner plans yet. As usual, I didn't, and it worked out perfectly. Apparently, she made too much shepherd's pie and asked if I wanted some. Now, here I am thinking that she's going to make me a plate or something small, but instead, she cooked up a whole ceramic casserole dish. Every ingredient was from scratch and it's safe to say my night was made.

Gazelle/Townsquare Media
Gazelle/Townsquare Media
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Am I alone on this matter or do other people generously cook for their neighbors just because? Keep in mind that this normally happens at least once per week. Again, no complaints here. Happy belly, happy neighbor, that's what I always say.

LOOK: Here Are 30 Foods That Are Poisonous to Dogs

To prepare yourself for a potential incident, always keep your vet's phone number handy, along with an after-hours clinic you can call in an emergency. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center also has a hotline you can call at (888) 426-4435 for advice.

Even with all of these resources, however, the best cure for food poisoning is preventing it in the first place. To give you an idea of what human foods can be dangerous, Stacker has put together a slideshow of 30 common foods to avoid. Take a look to see if there are any that surprise you.