MIDDLEBOROUGH — Students and staff at Middleborough High School were told to stay put on Monday morning as police and school officials investigated threatening comments from a student who allegedly said he would "shoot up the school."

The student was later found to have a knife in his backpack, according to a statement from school principal Paul Branagan sent to parents on Monday afternoon.

Branagan wrote in the statement that at 8:27 a.m. Monday, a concerned student emailed the school administration indicating that a classmate said he had a gun in his backpack and intended to “shoot up the school.”

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Administrators — working with the Middleborough Police Department — issued orders for students and staff to 'stay put', as per emergency protocol, according to the statement.

An investigation revealed that the student in question also made other comments suggesting that he had a knife.

Branagan stated that a knife was in fact found in his backpack, although no other items or weapons were found.

The stay-put order was lifted and the school day continued as scheduled once the investigation was over and any possible threat to the school was "neutralized," Branagan wrote.

"I applaud and thank the quick-thinking student who informed the Administration of their concern," he wrote, also thanking the town's police department and telling parents to call the school with questions or concerns.

No further details on the student involved or any disciplinary action taken will be released.

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