Derek and Jennifer Frates of Dartmouth are dreaming of someday moving to Portugal. They are not alone. According to The Wall Street Journal, Americans are relocating to Portugal "in droves."

"Retirees are drawn (to Portugal) by a low cost of living, healthcare, a sunny climate, and tax incentives," wrote Kathleen Hughes. "The cost of living in Portugal varies, but consumer prices with rent are about 40 percent lower than in the U.S. according to Numbeo, an online database."

Why the Frates Family Wants to Move to Portugal

Jennifer Frates has already established dual citizenship with Portugal. Her 6-year-old daughter Arya and 16-month-old son Tyson have dual citizenship as well. She said Derek will acquire dual citizenship when the family returns to Portugal for a visit this summer.

Arya has already visited Portugal twice.

Jennifer said she and Derek would like to settle in Algarve in the southern region of mainland Portugal.

"Beautiful weather, beautiful beaches, and I have family there," she said. "Algarve is where Europeans retire to, so why not us?"

Jennifer said she and Derek will likely wait until the kids are in college before purchasing a home in Algarve.

"I don't want to disrupt their lives too much," she said. "We'll just travel there all the time until then."

The couple would likely maintain residences in both countries because of the kids.

Not Everyone Would Prefer Portugal

Eddy Duarte Freitas emigrated to the United States from Portugal when he was a child. Freitas, who lives in New Bedford, said he might like to return to Portugal someday but isn't sure.

"The problem is I love the United States," he said.

The WSJ report suggests that many find the lifestyle in Portugal to be considerably less stressful than in the fast-paced United States, but Hughes reminded her readers that relocating to another country is not something to be done without careful consideration.

Would you consider retiring to another country? If so, where?

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