As we get set to head back to Plimoth Plantation for our annual Day-Before-Thanksgiving Morning Show broadcast, here are some interesting things you may not have know about the people who first settled in our neighboring Massachusetts community.

THE MAYFLOWER WASN'T BUILT FOR HUMAN PASSANGERS

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The Pilgrims trip across the Atlantic on the Mayflower was extremely dangerous.  Almost everyone got sick during the journey.   The people lived in filthy conditions and terrible discomfort.   One of the reasons is that the Mayflower was built for cargo, not humans.  It was actually designed to transport caskets, wine and other goods.

COOKS WERE IN SHORT SUPPLY DURING THE FIRST THANKSGIVING

That first winter took it's toll on the Pilgrims.   More than half of the settles died before they were able to celebrate that first harvest.   Many of those who passed away were adult women.   When the Pilgrims and Native Americans finally got together for that first Thanksgiving dinner, there were only 4 women to prepare the feast.  Over 100 guests and only 4 cooks.   It must of have been hectic.

THE PILGRIMS SPOTTED LAND BEFORE PLYMOUTH ROCK

Plymouth and Plymouth Rock have gone down in history as the place where the Pilgrims feet first touched American soil.    But, it has been learned that the Mayflower first sailed past Cape Cod, but for some reason passed it by.  

WOMEN GAVE BIRTH ON THE MAYFLOWER

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The voyage across the Atlantic was tough.  Conditions were less than ideal and many of the people on board thought they were going die at sea.    Just imagine being pregnant and going through that experience.    Elizabeth Hopkins gave birth to a baby boy while at sea.  h was named Oceanus Hopkins.  Later, after the Pilgrims landed, many more babies were born.   Some were given names like Angel, Americus, Freedom and Opportunity.

THE PILGRIMS DIDN'T EAT WITH FORKS

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Can you imagine eating Thanksgiving dinner without using a fork?   The Pilgrims used spoons and knives, but no forks were to be found.   Luckily, they were allowed to eat with their hands.   Also, they swapped plates and cups, so the spread of disease went unchecked. 

More of these interesting facts coming on the 27th, when we do the FUN Morning Show live from Plimoth Plantation.